What to Do When You Find Orphaned (baby) Animals

babybirdf

In recent days, Ottawa By-law & Regulatory Services has received an increased number of calls regarding orphaned wild animals.

In many cases, these animals have not been orphaned, rather their mothers have gone out to forage for food and will return.

Should you come upon an animal that you suspect has been orphaned, please do not attempt to remove it. It is best to leave it alone and allow time for its mother to return.

If you have moved the animal, please return it to where back to the spot you found it. It is a myth that their mothers will reject a baby because a human has handled it.

Allow some time for the mother to return. If the mother does not return, please call 3-1-1 to report the animal as orphaned.

Further information can be found at the Rideau Valley Wildlife Sanctuary and Ottawa Humane Society websites:

http://www.rideauwildlife.org/orphaned-or-injured-wildlife/

http://www.ottawahumane.ca/services/wildlife-problems-2/

By-Law Regulatory Statistics Q1 – Ward 6

service-ottawa

I would like to take a moment to supply residents with a breakdown of the quarterly by-law regulatory service request report.
Every three months, by-law services releases a ward-by-ward summary of general request types. These requests range from a multitude of services offered by calling or emailing 3-1-1 (311@ottawa.ca).
By-law & Regulatory Services experienced an overall increase of 8% in total call volume compared to Q1 of 2016.
The full report can be found by clicking here and Stittsville’s individual report can be found here.
As you can observe, parking was the most-requested by-law item within our ward (140) however it only comprised 1.5% of the city’s total parking requests. Alternatively, Stittsville’s greatest reflection against the city as a whole were requests regarding parks (3%) which only saw 2 requests.

Learning from these trends means that as a City, we will be better equipped for knowing where to invest resources in the future.
I encourage residents to take a moment and see what trends they can spot. Of course, as your City Councillor, I am always keen to hear your well thought-out ideas regarding how to improve our community. You can do so by emailing me at Shad.Qadri@ottawa.ca.

Q4 By-law Regulatory Services Statistics

service-ottawa

I would like to take a moment to supply residents with a breakdown of the quarterly by-law regulatory service request report.

Every three months, by-law services releases a ward-by-ward summary of general request types. These requests range from a multitude of services offered by calling or emailing 3-1-1 (311@ottawa.ca).

 

By-law & Regulatory Services experienced an overall increase of 11% in total call volume compared to Q4 of 2016.

The full report for the year can be found by clicking here and Stittsville’s individual report can be found here. You can also review Q4’s individual ward-by-ward report here.

 

As you can observe, parking was the most-requested by-law item within our ward this year (637 requests from 489 last year) however it only comprised 1.7% of the total city’s parking requests. Alternatively, Stittsville’s greatest reflection against the city as a whole were requests regarding parks (73 requests down from 81 requests in 2016). It is also interesting to note the sharp increase in noise complaints up 0.6% in Stittsville from last year and the sharp decrease in sign requests down 0.9% from last year.

Overall, By-law & Regulatory Services experienced an overall increase of +8% in total call volume in 2017 compared to 2016.

 

Learning from these trends means that as a City, we will be better equipped for knowing where to invest resources in the future.

I encourage residents to take a moment and see what trends they can spot. Of course, as your City Councillor, I am always keen to hear your well thought-out ideas regarding how to improve our community. You can do so by emailing me at Shad.Qadri@ottawa.ca.

Christmas Tree Pick-up

treegarbage
Throwing out christmas tree

Each year in January, the City of Ottawa will collect your old, dried up Christmas trees on your regularly scheduled green bin collection day but there are some things you should know before you say goodbye to the smell of pine needles in your living room.

 

Please ensure that your Christmas tree is free of all decorations including tinsel and is not wrapped in plastic.

 

The City of Ottawa expects to pick up almost 500 tons of Christmas trees in the month of January. Because of this large volume, trees may potentially not be picked up at the same time as the rest of your waste because the number of trees in one truck can cause capacity issues for regular green bin.

 

If by the end of your collection day your tree has yet to be taken, I would recommend you contact service Ottawa with your home address either by calling 3-1-1 or emailing 311@ottawa.ca to have the tree picked up. You can also visit https://myservice.ottawa.ca to complete a request form.

Remember to Keep Fire Hydrants Clear of Snow!

hydrants

As snowfall continues to accumulate across the City this winter, I would like to take a moment to remind residents to be conscientious of their joint responsibilities in ensuring access to fire hydrants.

When clearing snow from your driveways or walkways, take precaution to avoid piling snow on or against fire hydrants. Buried or obstructed hydrants can create delays in emergency response which may prove disastrous in certain situations.

If you notice a hydrant covered in snow, please call 3-1-1 or email the location of the hydrant to 311@ottawa.ca.

Together, we can help to keep our communities safe.

Driving Safe Through the Winter

black-ice-1

With the extreme cold temperatures that we have received this past month, I wanted to take a moment to share with residents some important information regarding safe driving in the wintertime.

 

While it is common knowledge that snowy weather can make any drive more dangerous and should prompt vehicles to proceed with caution when stopping, switching lanes, or making turns, it is important to note that even if the weather conditions and roads may seem clear, the dangerous potential of frost and black ice may still be present.

 

When the air warms suddenly, after a prolonged cold spell that has left the surface well below freezing, the result can be localized frost or black ice. The prime time for the development of this frost/ice is between sunset and sunrise when temperatures are typically the coldest. The most common locations this occurs are shaded or tree covered parts of roadways due to lack of sunshine and because of their ability to freeze quickly. Bridges and overpasses are also prime locations.

 

In cases such as this, the City will often spread sand instead of salt as salt is not effective below -18 degrees Celsius.

 

Some may ask if the truck operators are able to add additional abrasive to road areas that may be deemed to freeze quickly. For example near shaded areas or under bridges. There is a set rate in the on board computer of the truck for application of sand in this scenario. The operator has the ability to hit a ‘blast button’ which will double the application rate however this is typically used on hills, curves and intersections where breaking is required – the sand is spread on a wider pattern covering most of the lane of travel. Depending on the area commuter, traffic can wear off the sand from the surface depending on traffic volumes.

 

It is also worthwhile to note that highways including Highway 417 are not maintained by the City Of Ottawa; this is the responsibility of the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario and their contractors.

 

Should you be concerned or notice roadways that appear icy or need winter maintenance please contact 311 to report this and a City truck can be deployed to review and attend to the situation.

Report sick and injured animals to the City of Ottawa

injureddog

Starting Friday, January 5, the City of Ottawa will handle calls about sick and injured animals and will take on responsibility for transporting them.

 

If you see an injured domestic animal, such as a dog or cat, or small wild animal, such as a raccoon, squirrel, rabbit or skunk, please call 3-1-1. The City will assess the situation and dispatch a fully trained by-law officer to transport the animal, if needed. The by-law officer will bring the animal to either the Ottawa Humane Society or an emergency veterinary hospital.

 

The City has 54 by-law officers who have received training in the care and handling of animals. The City will hire a new wildlife management officer who will lead a specialized team of up to eight officers that will handle animals and deal with the increase in calls.

 

The Ottawa Valley Wild Bird Care Centre, the Rideau Valley Wildlife Sanctuary and other animal rescue organizations, will continue their good work in caring for sick, injured and orphaned animals.

 

The City does not respond to calls regarding human-wildlife conflicts, such as raccoons in the garbage or squirrels in attics. These issues are the responsibility of the property owner, who may consult the Ottawa Valley Wild Bird Care Centre or the Rideau Valley Wildlife Sanctuary for information on what to do.

 

To report animal abuse or neglect, please call the Ontario SPCA at 310-SPCA.

 

The Ottawa Humane Society previously provided animal rescue services in Ottawa, including picking up injured domestic animals and wildlife, while the City responded overnight.

 

The City expects to receive approximately 1,300 additional calls per year to transport sick and injured animals.

Service Ottawa / 3-1-1

service-ottawa

With autumn falling upon us soon and summer schedules coming to an end, I thought I would take this opportunity to remind residents about some of the useful resources available by reaching out to Service Ottawa.

 

Service Ottawa, also known as 3-1-1, is the City’s primary by-law enforcement and informational tool. There are many ways they can be contacted, either by calling 3-1-1 directly, emailing 311@ottawa.ca, or creating an account at myservice.ottawa.ca and filing a report online.

 

Some of the services include:

  • Reporting a parking concern;
  • Reporting a problem with a road, sidewalk, or pathway;
  • Reporting a pothole on the road;
  • Reporting an issue with / Information on Garbage and recycling collection;
  • Reporting concerns with noisy/off-leash pets;
  • Reporting graffiti/property damage;
  • Reporting a problem with street lighting;
  • Reporting abundances of garbage, debris, or litter;
  • Requesting removal of noxious plants such as wild parsnip, poison ivy, or giant hogweed;
  • Requesting maintenance of trees on municipal property;
  • Requesting removal of a dead animal on the road;
  • Paying a traffic/parking ticket;
  • Paying your property tax, water, or sewer bill;
  • …And much more

For any OC Transpo-related comments or concerns, please use the online customer feedback form available on the OC Transpo website here.

 

Reporting a concern to Service Ottawa is the most efficient means toward ensuring your request is responded to in an organized and timely manner. Upon completion of their report, should any residents feel that their concerns were not addressed in full, I welcome you to then email my office at Shad.Qadri@ottawa.ca with your service request number so that I may follow up with responsible staff to ensure your unique needs are met.

 

For any additional needs, you can also refer to one of the City of Ottawa’s in-person Client Service Centres.

 

I highly encourage all residents to review some of 3-1-1’s wide range of services and consider creating an account at MyService Ottawa to reap the full benefits and ease of this useful online tool.

 

For more information, please visit https://myservice.ottawa.ca/

The City of Ottawa has worked with a local develop this year to launch Pinpoint311, an interactive mobile application for Apple, Android, and Blackberry devices. The app allows residents to submit and track service requests, attach photos and see other service requests and information in the City. For more information on that please visit my website here.

By-law Q2 Report

service-ottawa

I would like to take a moment to supply residents with a breakdown of the quarterly by-law regulatory service request report.

Every three months, by-law services releases a ward-by-ward summary of general request types. These requests range from a multitude of services offered by calling or emailing 3-1-1 (311@ottawa.ca).

 

By-law & Regulatory Services experienced an overall decrease of -3.5% in total call volume compared to Q2 of 2016.

The full report can be found here and Stittsville’s individual report can be found here.

 

As you can observe, parking was the most-requested by-law item within our ward (268) however it only comprised 1.5% of the total city’s parking requests (consistent with last year’s statistics at Q2). Alternatively, Stittsville’s greatest reflection against the city as a whole were requests regarding care of streets (3.8%) and signs (3.8%) which saw 51 and 23 requests respectively for the first half of the year. At this time last year, Parks were among the highest representation of requests in Stittsville at 5.2% (this year down to 2.8%).

Learning from these trends helps the City of Ottawa to ensure that proper investments are made into resources for the future.

I encourage residents to take a moment and see what trends they can spot. Of course, as your City Councillor, I am always keen to hear your well thought-out ideas regarding how to improve our community. You can do so by emailing me at Shad.Qadri@ottawa.ca.

Noise By-law Review – Online Survey

The City of Ottawa’s By-law and Regulatory Services Branch is conducting a Noise By-law review, and residents are invited to provide their feedback through an online public consultation survey or by attending one of the three public workshops. The online survey runs until Monday, May 1.

 

The online survey will provide residents with brief facts on the by-law and an opportunity to give their opinions on the possible changes and additions.

 

Residents can also register at one of the following three, in-person public workshops, where participants can collaboratively share ideas on creating solutions to various noise-related issues:

 

  • Tuesday, April 25, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
    Greenboro Community Centre
    Room: Meeting Room A & B

 

  • Wednesday, April 26, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
    McNabb Recreation Centre
    Room: Assembly Hall

 

  • Monday, May 1, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
    Overbrook Community Centre
    Room: Main Reception Hall

 

Space is limited at all three workshops. Interested participants can register at ottawa.ca. All sites are accessible. When you register, please advise of any accommodations you may require.

 

Feedback from the online consultation and workshops will be combined with other studies and stakeholder consultations to develop a recommendations report that will go before the Community and Protective Services Committee, currently scheduled on May 18, and City Council on May 24.

 

I highly encourage all residents to take a moment to complete the survey to share their thoughts on any potential future changes to the By-law.