What to do if you find a tick?

With the warmer temperatures more people will be outdoors so too will the dreaded tick. If you find a tick on your or your pet’s body, remove it as soon as possible. The risk of getting Lyme disease increases with the length of time the tick remains attached.

 Since Ottawa is now considered an at-risk area for Lyme disease, it is important to contact your doctor if you believe a tick has been attached to you for 24 or more hours, or if you are unsure how long the tick has been attached to you, so that your doctor can determine if you need treatment with antibiotics. Treatment with antibiotics would be considered when:

  • the tick has been attached for 24 or more hours or is fully or partially engorged and
  • it has been less than or equal to 72 hours since the tick has been removed. If the tick was attached for less than 24 hours and its body does not appear swollen from feeding or if you removed a tick and more than 72 hours have passed, you should still be on the lookout for signs and symptoms of Lyme disease for the next 30 days. If you do develop symptoms, consult your health care provider. If For more information on ticks and removal of an imbedded tick please visit the following link.